February 21, 2024
Aspen Nightlife And The Altitude

Aspen Nightlife and the Altitude

Aspen Nightlife

Finding things to do in Aspen, Colorado during the day isn’t difficult – get out on the slopes and ski or enjoy one of the other winter sports that you love. At night, however, Aspen really comes to life with Aspen nightlife! No matter how old or young you are, there is something to do in Aspen twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

Music and dancing are the biggest Aspen nightlife attractions, but there is more to do than just that – so if you aren’t quite old enough to get into the various bars and clubs in the area, don’t think that you will be bored at night – you won’t be! Start by finding out what activities are planned for the evening at your lodge or hotel. Most lodges and hotels have events planned throughout the season – and this is a good place to start finding things to do after the slopes have closed for the day.

Shopping in Aspen is another highlight. There are many galleries and specialty shops that you won’t find in your own hometown. Take advantage of this. Most shops are open after the slopes have closed for the day, and many stay open late because they understand that you want to spend your daylight hours out on the slopes.

If you aren’t old enough for the club scene, take advantage of the teen nights that are offered by many of the resorts. These are safe fun nights for teens, which parents will approve of. Teens also enjoy the offerings at many of the spas. Spas aren’t just for adults. Enjoy the skin treatments, massages, saunas, and hot tubs. Some resorts also have game rooms for the teens and younger kids.

If you are old enough for the bars and clubs – finding something to do won’t be hard at all. Again, find out what is happening in the evening at your lodge or hotel first. If you aren’t interested, hit the streets. Almost everything is within walking distance in Aspen, and anything that is out of walking distance is accessible by bus or taxi. If you will be drinking, do not drive your car to the bar or club – find alternate transportation.

The Aspen Recreation center has many planned events throughout the season that are appropriate for adults and kids. However, if you are planning to bring the kids, but you want to enjoy some adult Aspen nightlife as well, child care may be available through your lodge or hotel.

Aspen Nightlife and the Altitude

There is more to do in Aspen than ski! The Aspen nightlife is like nothing you will experience elsewhere. The warmth and camaraderie of all of the skiers, from all of the different lodges is quite special, and remarkable. You will have a good time in Aspen, no matter what you choose to do, but there is one thing that you should be very aware of before you start your party – the altitude.

Aspen sits about 8000 feet above sea level. Unless you live in a high altitude area, you will need to adjust to this altitude. You may find yourself feeling dizzy or light headed, and you may even find it a bit difficult to breath. Altitude Sickness is a serious problem, and if your symptoms become extreme, you should seek medical attention.

If you will be drinking, you need to know that the altitude will have a large impact on the way your body handles the alcohol. Many people who are not used to such a high altitude find that they become drunker on much less alcohol, in a very short period of time. It is best that you avoid drinking alcohol at all until you have adjusted to the altitude.

It is also important to recognize the signs of both Altitude sickness and Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). Altitude sickness can be recognized by hyperventilation, shortness of breath during exertion, increased urination, changed breathing patterns at night, strange dreams, and frequently waking from sleep during the night. Acute Mountain Sickness, on the other hand, is recognized by loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue or weakness, dizziness, light-headedness, difficulty sleeping, confusion, and a staggering gait.

As you can see, the symptoms of both Altitude Sickness and Acute Mountain Sickness somewhat resemble the symptoms of drinking too much alcohol. The only way to rule out being drunk is to not drink for at least 48 hours after your arrival in the higher altitude. You should also seek medical attention if your symptoms last more than 48 hours, or if you show signs of Acute Mountain Sickness. AMS can be deadly if it is not treated.

Health care professionals suggest that you avoid drinking alcohol because the effects are magnified at a high altitude. Avoid strenuous activity for the first couple of days after arriving at the higher altitude. Drink extra fluid and visit a doctor if you have symptoms of AMS immediately for treatment.